Wednesday Weirdness Roundup

  • If you’re wondering why I bother with this blog and Leaving Alex Jonestown, it’s because of people like the girl I’ll call Susie. Susie is an 18-year-old waitress at a restaurant in a small Minnesota town, and last week she told my mother that there’s no way she’s going to get an H1N1 shot. After watching a raft of YouTube videos, she thinks a teeny-tiny microchip will be injected into her bloodstream. She’s also freaked about U.S. concentration camps and the usual range of YouTube WTFery. ‘Cause we all know that the Illuminati Freemasonic Reptiles have nothing better to do than track every movement of a teenage waitress in Minnesota, right?
  • Proof that everything is scarier when you present it in dramatically backlit titles, with choral music: Secrets of Masons. For a mere $37, you can supposedly pre-order all the juicy secrets the Masons don’t want you to know, such as “We like to dunk our digestive biscuits in lukewarm tea.”
  • A friend wanted to know what I think of the “Free-man-on-the-land” movement (in which disgruntled white men attempt to opt out of the system by reverting to common law, so they can do all the cool stuff that The Man won’t let them do, like beating their common-law girlfriends to death for burning the fried bologna). So here’s what I think: It’s retarded b.s. I’m not saying it’s a bad idea in principle (although it is), but let’s stop and think about what would happen if everyone decided they were above the law. Would you want this Freeman to be beyond the rule of law?
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5 thoughts on “Wednesday Weirdness Roundup

  1. " A Freeman-on-the-Land is a human being in a common law jurisdiction who lawfully revokes or denies consent to be represented and governed and exists completely free of all statutory restraints, obligations and restrictions."That's so bizarre. I can't imagine any legal system where someone can simply declare they are above the law.I'm having a hard time understanding what they're trying to get at, it comes across like the 16th Amendment and income tax gibberish — legalish sounding statements that are dangerously wrong. And it sounds like if you follow it, you're in for a world of legal troubles, just like 'tax protestors'.

  2. "You educate yourself a little bit so you understand what it is you are claiming. Then you create and serve a Notice of Understanding and Intent and a Claim of Right.This grants the affected parties an opportunity to dispute your claims, if they don’t the claim is cured and the rights, freedoms or powers thus claimed are secured and free to be exercised with total impunity.If anyone tries interfering with you after that, they are breaking the law and if you have a notice of fee schedule served, they will have to pay according to that schedule"Oh, I can't wait to send out little handwritten notices to all my neighbors, ao I can start raking in all that "fee schedule" cash. Pure genius. And of course, since we're all "completely free of all statutory restraints", dispute resolution should rock, also.

  3. SecretsOfMasons.com is a complete and total scam!Your $37 gets you an amateurish CD that has PDF documents that were lifted directly from other websites — they didn't even bother to change the file names on many of them. Far from "astonishing secrets", everything on this CD (including the $19 bonus) is readily available on other websites such as http://www.phoenixmasonry.org. These "shocking books" are in reality a collection of lectures and booklets, most dating from the early 1900s.Oh — the address posted on the website is a house. The St. Petersburg BBB says they can't find a business there. For what it's worth, the CD is airmailed from China.Finally, the money-back guarantee is worthless. No phone number is listed on the website, emails are returned with an automated message saying to use their on-line ticketing system, and no one ever responds to the tickets!PLEASE — don't waste your money! If you want real information, check out "Idiot's Guide to Freemasonry" or "Complete Dummies Guide to Freemasonry" at any bookstore or library. Better yet, ask a mason to join and find out first hand that the masons aren't a secret society, but a society with secrets. As the saying goes, "2B1ASK1".

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